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Computerworld

Computerworld
  • Mozilla earlier this month quietly outlined paid support for enterprise users of Firefox, but last week scrubbed the reference from its website, saying that it is "still exploring that option."The offering - labeled "Mozilla Enterprise Client Support" - was to start at $10 per "supported installation," which likely referred to per-device, not per-user, pricing. It's unclear whether that was an annual or monthly fee, and Mozilla declined to say which it was when asked.In return for the fee, Mozilla said on the now-absent Firefox enterprise site - still visible through the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine - customers would be able to privately report bugs via a new web portal and receive fixes on a timeline dependent on the impact and urgency of the problem. Customers would also be able to file requests for help with Firefox's installation and deployment, management policies, functionality and customization.To read this article in full, please click here

  • Look, Google's Android 10 gestures aren't perfect — no two ways about that. But for all the negative attention the new navigation system rightfully receives, it's actually come a long way since its painfully awkward debut in an early Android 10 beta.And you know what? At this point, warts and all, the Android 10 gestures are actually pretty pleasant to use — once you give yourself the chance to get used to 'em.Part of that simply boils down to a matter of adjustment, as a change like this is inevitably gonna be a bit of a shock at first. But part of it is also a matter of figuring out some subtle tricks to make the most of Android 10's gesture setup. Some of the tricks may seem obvious, once you consider them, while others seem almost like unintentional inclusions. But all of them go a long way in making the new gestures faster, smoother, and more effective to use.To read this article in full, please click here

  • With Microsoft embracing Linux ever more tightly, might it do the heretofore unthinkable and dump the NT kernel in favor of the Linux kernel? No, I’m not ready for the funny farm. As it prepares Windows 11, Microsoft has been laying the groundwork for such a radical release.I’ve long toyed with the idea that Microsoft could release a desktop Linux. Now I’ve started taking that idea more seriously — with a twist. Microsoft could replace Windows’ innards, the NT kernel, with a Linux kernel.It would still look like Windows. For most users, it would still work like Windows. But the engine running it all would be Linux.To read this article in full, please click here